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Response to letter: “Association of elevated blood homocysteine with cognitive decline in early, untreated Parkinson's disease”

  • Frederic Sampedro
    Affiliations
    Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain

    Biomedical Research Institute (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain

    Centro de Investigación en Red-Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain

    Radiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain
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  • Saul Martínez-Horta
    Affiliations
    Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain

    Biomedical Research Institute (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain

    Centro de Investigación en Red-Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain
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  • Jaime Kulisevsky
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Mas Casanovas 90, 08041 Barcelona, Spain.
    Affiliations
    Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain

    Biomedical Research Institute (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain

    Centro de Investigación en Red-Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain
    Search for articles by this author
      Chadwick and Green have written an interesting letter [
      • Christine Chadwick W.
      • Green Ralph
      Association of elevated blood homocysteine with cognitive decline in early, untreated Parkinson’s disease.
      ] confirming and extending our recently published findings regarding the role of homocysteine in Parkinson's disease (PD) [
      • Sampedro F.
      • et al.
      Increased homocysteine levels correlate with cortical structural damage in Parkinson’s disease.
      ]. The fact that, in a large and longitudinal cohort, elevated homocysteine was associated with a faster Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) decline but was unrelated to motor progression reinforces the potential role of this biomarker at promoting cortical injury.

      Keywords

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      References

        • Christine Chadwick W.
        • Green Ralph
        Association of elevated blood homocysteine with cognitive decline in early, untreated Parkinson’s disease.
        J. Neurol. Sci. 2022; 434 (Epub 2022 Feb 12, PMID: 35180679)120185https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2022.120185
        • Sampedro F.
        • et al.
        Increased homocysteine levels correlate with cortical structural damage in Parkinson’s disease.
        J. Neurol. Sci. 2022 Jan 12; 434120148https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2022.120148
        • Martinez-Horta S.
        • Horta-Barba A.
        • Kulisevsky J.
        Cognitive and behavioral assessment in Parkinson’s disease.
        Expert. Rev. Neurother. 2019 Jul; 19: 613-622https://doi.org/10.1080/14737175.2019.1629290