Upper-limb movement smoothness after stroke and its relationship with measures of body function/structure and activity – A cross-sectional study

  • Maria Laura Schiefelbein
    Affiliations
    Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Ana Paula Salazar
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Ritchele Redivo Marchese
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Kátia Daniele Rech
    Affiliations
    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Giulia Palermo Schifino
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Caroline Santos Figueiredo
    Affiliations
    Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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  • Veronica Cimolin
    Affiliations
    Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
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  • Aline Souza Pagnussat
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre – UFCSPA, 245, Sarmento Leite Street, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
    Affiliations
    Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil

    Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Brazil
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Published:April 13, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2019.04.017

      Highlights

      • Movement smoothness is correlated with other measures of ICF body function/structure.
      • UL-FMA predicts UL movement smoothness in chronic post-stroke subjects.
      • Movement smoothness influences the UL level of activity after stroke.
      • Movement smoothness should be emphasized during stroke rehabilitation.

      Abstract

      Introduction

      After a stroke, upper limb (UL) motor impairments interfere with functional activities and quality of life. Even though a range of assessment tools has been developed to assess UL, few studies explore the interfaces between different levels of functioning after stroke.

      Objectives

      (a) verify the correlation between movement smoothness and other measures of body function/structure [UL - Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and handgrip strength]; (b) verify which body function/structure [UL-FMA and/or handgrip strength] could predict UL movement smoothness; and (c) verify if movement smoothness could predict levels of activity, as assessed by the Box and Block Test (BBT).

      Materials and methods

      Cross-sectional study. Thirty-four individuals with chronic hemiparesis after stroke were enrolled. Measurements of body function/structure included FMA, handgrip strength and kinematic measure of movement smoothness. Levels of activity were measured using the Box and Block Test (BBT).

      Results

      Movement smoothness showed strong correlation with FMA (r = 0.70, p < .001) and moderate correlation with handgrip strength (r = 0.63, p < .001). FMA explained 46.4% of the variation in movement smoothness. Movement smoothness was moderately correlated with BBT (r = −0.560, p < .005) and predicted 31% of the variation in BBT.

      Conclusion

      We recommend the use of UL-FMA to predict movement smoothness in chronic post-stroke subjects. This study also showed that movement smoothness influences the level of activity. Then, movement smoothness may be emphasized during stroke rehabilitation to enhance the UL level of activity in chronic post-stroke subjects.

      Keywords

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