Advertisement

The move: When neurosciences teach us to better teach neurosciences

  • Marc Vérin
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Behavior and Basal Ganglia Research Unit (EA4712), University of Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
    Affiliations
    Behavior and Basal Ganglia Research Unit (EA4712), University of Rennes 1, Rennes, France

    Department of Neurology, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France

    Institut des Neurosciences Cliniques de Rennes, Rennes, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Pascal Benquet
    Affiliations
    Institut des Neurosciences Cliniques de Rennes, Rennes, France

    INSERM U1099, LTSI, University of Rennes 1, Rennes, France
    Search for articles by this author
      Although lecturing has been the predominant mode of instruction since the foundation of universities in Western Europe over most of a millennium ago, the traditional “teaching by telling” approach is now being undermined by the latest neuroscience and educational science data. In a well-designed recent meta-analysis published by Freeman et al. [
      • Freeman S.
      • Eddy S.L.
      • Mcdonough M.
      • Smith M.K.
      • Okoroafor N.
      • Jordt H.
      • Wenderoth M.P.
      Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.
      ], 158 studies of student performance under active learning were compared with 67 studies under traditional lecturing. The results demonstrate that active learning increases both performance and motivation, and decreases failures. As Louis Cozolino points out in his book «The Social Neuroscience of Education» [
      • Cozolino Louis
      The Social Neuroscience of Education.
      ]: «While teachers may focus on what they are teaching, evolutionary history and current neuroscience suggest that it is who they are and the emotional environment in the classroom they are able to create that are the fundamental regulator of neuroplasticity». The same conclusions are certainly applicable to the teaching of clinical neurosciences. Hundred thirty years after the important contribution of Jean-Martin Charcot in La Salpêtrière to education in neurology by changing abstract teaching into concrete teaching by putting his patients on stage during the lecture, Roze et al. have implemented in the same place a novel learner friendly program: «The Move». To modernize the teaching approach while making it accessible and fun for students, staging elements of the TV show The Voice were incorporated (such as teams, battles, coaches, and performing in front of a jury). The Move belongs to a broad category of simulation-based learning. Comparing the performance of the students that participated in The Move program with a standard education group of students, The Move clearly improves medical student's long-term retention and delayed recall (30 months) of neurological semiology. Why is the Move program so efficient, and why is it particularly relevant for learning clinical neurosciences? Modern neurosciences who are interested in the mechanisms of learning provide strong clues to understanding the efficiency of innovative programs such as The Move.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of the Neurological Sciences
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Freeman S.
        • Eddy S.L.
        • Mcdonough M.
        • Smith M.K.
        • Okoroafor N.
        • Jordt H.
        • Wenderoth M.P.
        Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.
        Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. June 10, 2014; 111: 8410-8415
        • Cozolino Louis
        The Social Neuroscience of Education.
        W. W. Norton & Company, 2013 (ISBN 978-0-393-70609-3, 440 pages)
        • Ralph M.A.
        • Jefferies E.
        • Patterson K.
        • Rogers T.T.
        The neural and computational bases of semantic cognition.
        Nat. Rev. Neurosci. January, 2017; 18: 42-55
        • Chistiakova M.
        • Bannon N.M.
        • Bazhenov M.
        • Volgushev M.
        Heterosynaptic plasticity: multiple mechanisms and multiple roles.
        Neuroscientist. October, 2014; 20: 483-498
        • Rizzolatti G.
        • Sinigaglia C.
        The mirror mechanism: a basic principle of brain function.
        Nat. Rev. Neurosci. December, 2016; 17: 757-765
        • de Waal F.B.M.
        • Preston S.D.
        Mammalian empathy: behavioural manifestations and neural basis.
        Nat. Rev. Neurosci. August, 2017; 18: 498-509
        • Schütz-Bosbach S.
        • Prinz W.
        Perceptual resonance: action-induced modulation of perception.
        Trends Cogn. Sci. August, 2007; 11: 349-355
        • Arnsten A.F.
        Stress weakens prefrontal networks: molecular insults to higher cognition.
        Nat. Neurosci. October, 2015; 18: 1376-1385
        • Colasanti A.
        • Searle G.E.
        • Long C.J.
        • Hill S.P.
        • Reiley R.R.
        • Quelch D.
        • Erritzoe D.
        • Tziortzi A.C.
        • Reed L.J.
        • Lingford-Hughes A.R.
        • Waldman A.D.
        • Schruers K.R.
        • Matthews P.M.
        • Gunn R.N.
        • Nutt D.J.
        • Rabiner E.A.
        Endogenous opioid release in the human brain reward system induced by acute amphetamine administration.
        Biol. Psychiatry. September 1, 2012; 72: 371-377
        • Howe M.W.
        • Tierney P.L.
        • Sandberg S.G.
        • Phillips P.E.
        • Graybiel A.M.
        Prolonged dopamine signalling in striatum signals proximity and value of distant rewards.
        Nature. August 29, 2013; 500: 575-579
        • Westbrook A.
        • Braver T.S.
        Dopamine does double duty in motivating cognitive effort.
        Neuron. February 17, 2016; 89: 695-710