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A novel method for behavioral assessments of the common marmoset, marmodetector, detects general natural movement and changes in motor behavior

  • T. Yabumoto
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Suita, Japan
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  • F. Yoshida
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Endowed Research Department of Clinical Engineering Neuroscience, Suita, Japan

    Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Fukuoka, Japan

    Osaka University Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Suita, Japan
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  • K. Baba
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Suita, Japan

    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Hybrid medicine, Suita, Japan
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  • H. Hayakawa
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Suita, Japan
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  • H. Hamanaka
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Endowed Research Department of Clinical Engineering Neuroscience, Suita, Japan
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  • M. Hirata
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Endowed Research Department of Clinical Engineering Neuroscience, Suita, Japan

    Osaka University Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Suita, Japan
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  • H. Mochizuki
    Affiliations
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Suita, Japan
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      Background: Callithrix jacchus are small Neotropical primates, commonly known as common marmosets. The common marmoset occupies a distinctive phylogenetic position of an experimental model animal for neuroscience. Certain higher cognitive behaviors, and its associated brain disorders, may in some cases be more easily or accurately examined in a non-human primate than in rodent or other simple vertebrate animals. Marmoset will be useful as a non-human primate model to study the brain mechanisms of distinct higher cognitive behaviors and to serve as a bridge to translate knowledge from the preclinical studies using rodents to clinical studies.
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