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Evaluation of hormones in girls with epilepsy in dependence of receiving treatment

      Multiple changes in organism which are observed in prepubertal and pubertal age, create necessary not only of clear diagnostics, but also treatment of the disease in view of drug influence on hormonal functions. The aim of study was to investigate the influence of modern antiepileptic drugs on hormonal status in girls with epilepsy. In 50 girls aged 8–17 years with epilepsy, concentration in blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin antibodies (a/b TG), triiodothyronine (Т3), thyroxine (Т4), parathyroid hormone (P) and cortisol (C) was investigated. Treatment in most cases included valproic acid, carbamazepine and topiramate. Regardless of applied drugs significant differences in content of hormones were found in 2 (9,52%) cases, and in width of distribution of values — in 7 (33,33%) cases. Highest content of TSH found in girls 8–17 years treated with valproic acid, a/b TG — in ones who didn't got any antiepileptic drugs, T3 — in ones taking barbiturates, T4 — treated with topiramate, P — in girls taking valproic acid, C in girls 8–13 years receiving barbiturates and in girls 14–17 years — taking oxcarbazepine. Within 2–12 months after first study in 19 girls hormone levels were determined again. Levels of hormones in different treatment in relation to original average content of hormones in all girls in 64,86% cases change so as was in the first study. Significant difference in content was found in all hormones in girls with epilepsy treated with different antiepileptic drugs. Choice of antiepileptic drug, its dose and correction should be made considering its impact on children's hormonal profile.
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